Happy National Read Across America Day and #DrSeuss Birthday! #FridayReads #kidlit #books

March 2, 2018

 

 

Welcome to this week’s edition of Friday Book Round-Up. Today is National Read Across America Day as well as Dr. Seuss’ birthday. In honor of both celebrations, I wanted to spotlight one of my favorite authors of all time: Dr. Seuss. Don’t know who he is or anything about his books? Read his bio:

 

“A person’s a person, no matter how small,” Theodor Seuss Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, would say. “Children want the same things we want. To laugh, to be challenged, to be entertained and delighted.”

 

Brilliant, playful, and always respectful of children, Dr. Seuss charmed his way into the consciousness of four generations of youngsters and parents. In the process, he helped millions of kids learn to read.

 

Dr. Seuss was born Theodor Geisel in Springfield, Massachusetts, on March 2, 1904. After graduating from Dartmouth College in 1925, he went to Oxford University, intending to acquire a doctorate in literature. At Oxford, Geisel met Helen Palmer, whom he wed in 1927. Upon his return to America later that year, Geisel published cartoons and humorous articles for Judge, the leading humor magazine in America at that time. His cartoons also appeared in major magazines such as Life, Vanity Fair, and Liberty. Geisel gained national exposure when he won an advertising contract for an insecticide called Flit. He coined the phrase, “Quick, Henry, the Flit!” which became a popular expression.

 

Geisel published his first children’s book, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, in 1937, after 27 publishers rejected it.

 

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1984, an Academy Award, three Emmy Awards, three Grammy Awards, and three Caldecott Honors, Geisel wrote and illustrated 44 books. While Theodor Geisel died on September 24, 1991, Dr. Seuss lives on, inspiring generations of children of all ages to explore the joys of reading. – Dr. Seuss’ Biography, courtesy of Amazon.com

 

I grew up on Seuss and his books are the foundation of my childhood. He taught me to read, learn my colors and numbers, to have fun, to play silly games as well as valuable life lessons I incorporate into my everyday life like taking care of the environment and be kind to others. It’s hard to pick out my favorites but here goes my top five:

 

How the Grinch Stole Christmas

 

he ultimate Dr. Seuss Christmas classic -- no holiday season is complete without the Grinch, Max, Cindy-Lou, and all the residents of Who-ville!

 

“Every Who down in Who-ville liked Christmas a lot . . . but the Grinch, who lived just north of Who-ville, did NOT!” Not since “’Twas the night before Christmas” has the beginning of a Christmas tale been so instantly recognizable. This heartwarming story about the effects of the Christmas spirit will grow even the coldest and smallest of hearts. Like mistletoe, candy canes, and caroling, the Grinch is a mainstay of the holidays, and his story is the perfect gift for young and old.

 

And don't forget to celebrate Grinch-mas this Christmas season, the annual holiday tradition inspired by How the Grinch Stole Christmas that encourages readers to grow their hearts three sizes by doing good deeds!

 

 

The Lorax

 

Long before “going green” was mainstream, Dr. Seuss’s Lorax spoke for the trees and warned of the dangers of disrespecting the environment. In this cautionary rhyming tale we learn of the Once-ler, who came across a valley of Truffula Trees and Brown Bar-ba-loots, and how his harvesting of the tufted trees changed the landscape forever. With the release of the blockbuster film version, the Lorax and his classic tale have educated a new generation of young readers not only about the importance of seeing the beauty in the world around us, but also about our responsibility to protect it.

 

 

The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins

 

As topical today as when it was first published in 1938, this book tells of Bartholomew Cubbins (from Caldecott Honor winner Bartholomew and the Oobleck) and his unjust treatment at the hands of King Derwin. Each time Bartholomew attempts to obey the king’s order to take off his hat, he finds there is another hat on his head. Soon it is Bartholomew’s head that is in danger . . . of being chopped off! While The 500 Hats is one of Dr. Seuss’s earliest works, it is nevertheless totally Seussian, addressing subjects that we know the good doctor was passionate about: abuse of power (as in Yertle the Turtle), rivalry (as in The Sneetches), and of course, zany good humor!

 

 

My Book About Me

 

THE beloved classic that helps kids write (and draw) a book all about themselves—with a little help from Dr. Seuss!

 

This classic hardcover activity book written by Dr. Seuss and illustrated by Roy McKie encourages children to write and draw their own biographies. With a mix of serious (and seriously silly!) "Yes" and "No" questions; fill-in-the-blanks; images to complete, and simple writing activities, My Book About Me, By ME, Myself is an ideal gift for elementary school children and one that will become a cherished keepsake for parents.

 

 

Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are?

 

Dr. Seuss’s irrepressible optimism is front and center in Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are?

 

“When you think things are bad,

when you feel sour and blue,

when you start to get mad . . .

you should do what I do!”

 

So begins the terrific advice of the wise old man in the Desert of Drize. This classic book provides the perfect antidote for readers of all ages who are feeling a bit down in the dumps. Thanks to Dr. Seuss’s trademark rhymes and signature illustrations, readers will, without a doubt, realize just how lucky they truly are.

 

Have a favorite Dr. Seuss book? Share in the comments below and don’t forget to share using the buttons below. See you next week!

 

MRS N, Book Addict

 

 

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