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5 stars for Beyond Stonebridge by Linda Griffin #ghoststory #supernatural #paranormalsuspense #romanticsuspense #bookreview



Title: Beyond Stonebridge

Author: Linda Griffin

Genre: Ghost Story Romance

 

Book Blurb:

 

In this sequel to Stonebridge, it is 1959, and Rynna Wyatt’s abusive husband Jason has fallen to his death after a fight with his bookish, disabled cousin Ted Demeray. The police would like to know exactly what happened, but it’s impossible to tell the whole truth. Jason’s death doesn’t end his relationship with them. Rynna is pregnant with his child and traumatized by his abuse. She and Ted leave Stonebridge Manor to start a new life in Brenford, where Ted teaches at the university, but Jason’s restless spirit follows and haunts Rynna’s dreams. He wants her back. He wants revenge. And he wants his son. How can Ted and Rynna oppose his claims and finally put him to rest?

 

 

My Review:

 

Jason is dead. And he wants his son.

 

In this sequel to Stonebridge, Rynna is now a widow after Jason falls to his death during a fight with Ted, his disabled cousin. And she’s pregnant with Jason’s baby. Trying to put the tragedy—and the abuse her late husband put her through—behind her, she marries Ted and starts a new life.

 

But Jason won’t have it. His presence follows the newlyweds and specially makes himself known when the baby is born.

 

This well-written and intricate story is delicately layered and nuanced. More than a ghost tale, Beyond Stonebridge delves into the skepticism of science about the spirit world. Ted, a geologist and firmly grounded in the sciences, is hesitant to attribute what’s happening in his home as supernatural. He explores the phenomenon through the only outlet he truly knows—books.

 

Griffin also dives into the culture of the 1950s. This story begins in 1959, and we see the world through that lens. Its mores and customs, and especially the way women are viewed.

 

To this, add another layer: the love story of Rynna and Ted. It’s a difficult and potentially tenuous union. She’s pregnant with his cousin’s baby, he’s in a wheelchair, and her ex-husband’s presence is straining their relationship.

 

In her straightforward style, Griffin’s writing gripped me from the beginning. She has cleverly transformed what could have been just a main element of the story—Jason’s lingering evil presence—into a main character. And because of that, the story holds so much suspense.

 

I confess, I read this book in a day. I couldn’t put it down. With every chapter, I waited for what would happen next. How would Jason show himself this time? With Jason’s death still under investigation, would the police find either Ted or Rynna responsible? Would their new marriage hold? And will they ever exorcise the presence?

 

While reading the first book in this series is recommended, it’s not necessary. This story stands on its own. But I guarantee, once you read Beyond Stonebridge, you’ll want to go read how this all began.

 

And be sure, when you start it, you have your beverage of choice and snacks nearby. And yes, maybe plan to order out dinner that day. You won’t be able to put it down.

 

My Rating: 5 stars

 

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Author Biography:

 

Growing up in San Diego, California, I developed a passion for the printed word with my very first Dick and Jane reader. As soon as I figured out that somebody must create those words, I knew I wanted to be a “book maker” when I grew up. I didn’t wait, though; I wrote my first story, “Judy and the Fairies,” when I was six. My love of books also led me to an MLS degree from UCLA and a career as a reference and collection development librarian at the San Diego Public Library, including twenty-two years managing the Central Library’s fiction collection. Retirement allowed me to put writing front and center. I’ve had twenty-three stories published in literary journals and anthologies, and Beyond Stonebridge is my ninth book from the Wild Rose Press.

 

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Reviewed by: Terry

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